Short Story Competition – Winners Announced

18/05/2017
News

Our short story competition was launched in October.  Writers from across the world were invited to use a particular quotation from Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park as the story title and respond in 2017 words or fewer: “Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.”   The competition deadline was the final day of February and we were delighted to receive 281 short stories for consideration.  25% of these entries were from outside the UK, from countries as various as South Africa, Sweden, Belgium and Bermuda.

Our wonderful judges were award winning short story writers  David Constantine and Claire Fuller.

WINNER Sally Tissington

Sally is just completing a collection of short stories called ‘Unravel’.  She has a published novel called ‘The Crocodile on the Carousel’ and has another one on the way. Sally teaches a wide variety of creative writing modules at the University of Warwick.

David Constantine described it as “An acerbic story, in which the selfishness is pretty evenly spread. Jane Austen’s maxim is shifted into  contemporary British life and with some venom a female academic relates things from her point of view. Which is: ‘We all know that life is intolerable.’ She herself contributes to that unhappy state. This is one of those fictions which show how not to live. The reader is required to answer back, imagine something better.”

Read Sally's story here.

SECOND PLACE Ingrid Jendrzejewski

Ingrid grew up in Indiana and studied creative writing at the University of Evansville, then physics at the University of Cambridge. Her writing has found homes in places like Passages North, The Los Angeles Review and The Conium Review, and she has received honors such as the Bath Flash Fiction Award. www.ingridj.com

Claire Fuller commented “I really liked the unusual structure of this story - placing big events in astrophysics alongside the life events of the protagonist. With so few words allowed, the author made sure every one earned its place. The story was clever but also felt very true.” 

Read Ingrid's story here.

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